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Black Friday was a suffragette demonstration in London on 18 November , in which women marched to the Houses of Parliament as part of their campaign to secure voting rights for women. The day earned its name from the violence meted out to protesters, some of it sexual, by the Metropolitan Police and male bystanders.
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Black Friday was a suffragette demonstration in London on 18 November , in which women marched to the Houses of Parliament as part of their campaign to secure voting rights for women. The day earned its name from the violence meted out to protesters, some of it sexual, by the Metropolitan Police and male bystanders.
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The following day another march on parliament was met with a police presence, and 18 demonstrators were arrested. On 19 November , newspapers reported on the events of the previous day. According to Morrell they "almost unanimously refrained from any mention of police brutality", and focussed instead on the behaviour of the suffragettes. He initially tried to explain the image away by saying the woman had collapsed through exhaustion.

Morrell observes that where sympathy was shown by newspapers, it was directed towards the policemen. The Times reported that "Several of the police had their helmets knocked off in carrying out their duty, one was disabled by a kick on the ankle, one was cut on the face by a belt, and one had his hand cut"; [77] The Daily Mirror wrote that "the police displayed great good temper and tact throughout and avoided making arrests, but as usual many of the Suffragettes refused to be happy until they were arrested On 3 March Georgiana Solomon —a suffragette who had been present at the demonstration—wrote to The Times to say that police had assaulted her.

She had been bed-ridden after their manhandling, and had not been able to make a complaint at the time. Instead, she had written to Churchill on 17 December with a full statement of what she had suffered, and the actions she had witnessed against others.

She had received a formal acknowledgement, but no further letter from the government on the events. Her letter to Churchill had been printed in full in the suffragette newspaper Votes for Women. The WSPU leadership were convinced that Churchill had given the police orders to manhandle the women, rather than arrest them quickly. Churchill denied the accusation in the House of Commons and was so angered he considered suing Christabel Pankhurst and The Times , who had reported the claim, for libel.

When members of the conciliation committee heard the stories of the demonstrators' maltreatment, they demanded a public inquiry, which was rejected by Churchill. The committee's secretary—the journalist Henry Brailsford —and the psychotherapist Jessie Murray collected statements from demonstrators, nearly all of which described acts of violence against the women; 29 of the statements also included details of violence that included indecency.

The action of which the most frequent complaint is made is variously described as twisting round, pinching, screwing, nipping, or wringing the breast. This was often done in the most public way so as to inflict the utmost humiliation.

Not only was it an offence against decency; it caused in many cases intense pain The language used by some of the police while performing this action proves that it was consciously sensual.

A woman, who gave her name as Miss H, stated that "One policeman She stated "I demanded that he should cease doing such a hateful action to a woman. He said, 'Oh, my old dear, I can grip you wherever I like to-day'"; [91] and another said "the policeman who tried to move me on did so by pushing his knees in between me from behind, with the deliberate intention of attacking my sex".

On 2 February the memorandum prepared by Murray and Brailsford was presented to the Home Office , along with a formal request for a public inquiry. I have made inquiry of the Commissioner [of Metropolitan Police] with regard to certain general statements included in the memorandum and find them to be devoid of foundation.

There is no truth in the statement that the police had instructions which led them to terrorise and maltreat the women. On the contrary, the superintendent in charge impressed upon them that as they would have to deal with women, they must act with restraint and moderation, using no more force than might be necessary, and maintaining under any provocation they might receive, control of temper.

The deaths of two suffragettes have been attributed to the treatment they received on Black Friday. Emmeline blamed her death on the maltreatment Clarke received at the two November demonstrations; [1] [96] Murray and Brailsford wrote that "we have no evidence which directly connects the death of Mrs Clarke" to the demonstrations.

She had given evidence to Brailsford and Murray that "One policeman after knocking me about for a considerable time, finally took hold of me with his great strong hands like iron just over my heart. I knew that unless I made a strong effort The deputations to parliament were stopped, and direct action, such as stone-throwing and window-breaking, became more common; this allowed women a chance to escape before the police could arrest them.

Sir Edward Troup , the under-secretary at the Home Office, wrote to the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police in January to say that "I think there can be no doubt that the least embarrassing course will be for the police not to arrest too soon or defer arresting too long", which became the normal procedure adopted.

On 17 November a vigil called "Remember the Suffragettes" took place on College Green , Parliament Square "in honour of direct action". From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. For other events, see List of Black Fridays. Timeline of women's suffrage and Women's suffrage in the United Kingdom.

Christabel Pankhurst and Annie Kenney interrupted a political rally in Manchester to ask the pro-women's suffrage Liberal Party politician Sir Edward Grey "Will the Liberal government give votes to women?

The two women were arrested for assault and obstruction ; on refusing to pay the fines levied against them, they were sent to prison. Hands, the Daily Mail journalist, coined the name suffragettes to belittle members of the WSPU in , but they adopted the label with pride. They were released early, rather than being reclassified. First Division prisoners were those who had committed crimes for political reasons.

They had open access to books and writing equipment, did not have to wear prison uniforms and could receive visitors. Prisoners in the Second and Third Divisions were managed under more restrictive prison regulations.

Every woman possessed of a household qualification, or of a ten-pound occupation qualification, within the meaning of the Representation of the People Act , shall be entitled to be registered as a voter, and, when registered, to vote for the county or borough in which the qualifying premises are situate.

For the purposes of this Act, a woman shall not be disqualified by marriage for being registered as a voter, provided that a husband and wife shall not both be qualified in respect of the same property. Books [ edit ] Atkinson, Diane The Remarkable Lives of the Suffragettes Kindle ed.

Conciliation Committee for Woman Suffrage Conciliation Committee for Woman Suffrage. The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide — Representation of the British Suffrage Movement. Hume, Leslie []. Kingsley Kent, Susan Sex and Suffrage in Britain, — The Fight for Votes for Women Kindle ed. Little, Brown Book Group. Violence Against Women in the Suffragette Movement. Women's Research and Resources Centre.

Mulvey Roberts, Marie; Mizuta, Tamae, eds. Pethick-Lawrence, Frederick , ed. The Story of How we Won the Vote. Pankhurst, Sylvia []. The March of the Women: In Purvis, June; Holton, Sandra. Rallings, Colin ; Thrasher, Michael , eds. British Electoral Facts, — Second ed. Peace and War The British Women's Suffrage Campaign — 2nd ed. The Spectacle of Women. University of Chicago Press.

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